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WASHINGTON, DC - Dec. 13: Bob Bixby, of The Concord Coalition, and Maya MacGuineas, of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, former House member Charlie Stenholm, Blue Dog Coalition member Allen Boyd, D-Fla., and Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, during a news conference on the alternative minimum tax. The dispute over the alternative minimum tax (AMT) may stretch to the closing hours of the session, as the Senate and House continue to feud over whether to include revenue-raising offsets in a final bill. Although the Senate voted, 88-5, on Dec. 6 to remove offsets from a House-passed "patch" (HR 3996) to the AMT, the Senate has not yet sent the bill back to the House. That inaction preserves the Senate's procedural flexibility, perhaps to send it back to the House at the last possible moment. That maneuver could put the House in a difficult position. Democrats there would face the unpleasant choice they have so far avoided: Do nothing and allow 21 million more people to be hit by the AMT for the 2007 tax year or accept the Senate bill, which would require caving on the pay-as-you-go rule that House Democrats have championed all year. The Blue Dog Coalition, of which Stenholm was a founding member, is a group of fiscally conservative Democrats. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly).

WASHINGTON, DC - Dec. 13: Bob Bixby, of The Concord Coalition, and Maya MacGuineas, of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, former House member Charlie Stenholm, Blue Dog Coalition member Allen Boyd, D-Fla., and Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, during a news conference on the alternative minimum tax. The dispute over the alternative minimum tax (AMT) may stretch to the closing hours of the session, as the Senate and House continue to feud over whether to include revenue-raising offsets...
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