1/1
dw07205040.jpg
02/05/07--Senate Budget Chairman Kent Conrad, D-N.D., during a photo op of the delivery of the President's fiscal 2008 budget proposal to the U.S. Capitol. President Bush's $2.9 trillion budget proposal for fiscal 2008 squeezes discretionary spending on domestic programs in favor of a continued buildup in military and war spending. The budget sent to Congress Monday proposes significant policy changes to restrain Medicare, Medicaid and other entitlement spending as part of a plan to balance the federal budget by fiscal 2012. The presidentÕs proposed budget, the first of his presidency to face a Democratic-controlled Congress, includes $929.8 billion in discretionary spending, up $57 billion or 6.5 percent. That figure does not include a proposed $145 billion in fiscal 2008 spending on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The president also has sought an additional $99.6 billion in war spending for the remainder of fiscal 2007 plus $3.4 billion in additional fiscal 2007 spending on hurricane relief. All but $3.6 billion of the overall discretionary spending increase for fiscal 2008 would be funneled toward security-related spending, resulting in a near freeze to domestic spending accounts. The budget, "The Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2008," is available in printed and electronic versions. The complete printed set of four volumes is 2,186 pages long, and weighs about 10 pounds.  Congressional Quarterly Photo by Scott J. Ferrell

02/05/07--Senate Budget Chairman Kent Conrad, D-N.D., during a photo op of the delivery of the President's fiscal 2008 budget proposal to the U.S. Capitol. President Bush's $2.9 trillion budget proposal for fiscal 2008 squeezes discretionary spending on domestic programs in favor of a continued buildup in military and war spending. The budget sent to Congress Monday proposes significant policy changes to restrain Medicare, Medicaid and other entitlement spending as part of a plan to balance...
more »

Copyright Congressional Quarterly Inc.