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10/13/06--Rep. Bob Ney exits U.S. District Court in Washington into a throng of media after pleading guilty in federal court Friday to making false statements and conspiracy to commit fraud, making him the first member of Congress to be convicted as part of the wide-ranging Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal. He said he would resign in the next few weeks, but House leaders demanded he resign immediately or they would move to expel him as soon as Congress reconvenes next month. Ney, R-Ohio, appearing in public for the first time since he entered alcohol rehabilitation, admitted to the charges before U.S. District Court Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle. Later, in a statement, he said: ÒI never acted to enrich myself or to get things I shouldnÕt, but over time I allowed myself to get too comfortable with the way things have been done in Washington, D.C., for too long. I accepted things I shouldnÕt have with the result that Jack Abramoff used my name to advance his own secret schemes of fraud and theft in ways I could never have imagined.Ó Ney said he plans to resign from Congress in the next few weeks. ÒHaving now appeared in court, I need to close up my congressional office. I want to make sure that my staff members are okay and that any open constituent matters and obligations are taken care of. Once I have done these things, I will be resigning from Congress,Ó he said. But in a joint statement, House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., Majority Leader John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, and Deborah Pryce, R-Ohio, GOP Conference chairwoman, said that was not fast enough. He faces up to 27 months in jail and $500,000 in fines when he is sentenced Jan. 19. Congressional Quarterly Photo by Scott J. Ferrell

10/13/06--Rep. Bob Ney exits U.S. District Court in Washington into a throng of media after pleading guilty in federal court Friday to making false statements and conspiracy to commit fraud, making him the first member of Congress to be convicted as part of the wide-ranging Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal. He said he would resign in the next few weeks, but House leaders demanded he resign immediately or they would move to expel him as soon as Congress reconvenes next month. Ney, R-Ohio,...
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