1/1
dw070620057.jpg
06/20/07--Rep. Michael N. Castle, R-Del., talks to reporters after a news conference after President Bush vetoed a bill Wednesday that would expand federally backed embryonic stem cell research. Castle is a sponsor of the House version of the legislation, along with Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo. It was the third veto of BushÕs presidency, and the second time he has vetoed embryonic stem cell research legislation. It may not be the last time, as lawmakers are discussing adding an embryonic stem cell research provision to a spending bill. Bush also signed an executive order that would expand the kinds of stem cell lines tracked by the National Institutes of Health. The NIH currently tracks the embryonic stem cell lines available for federal funding in a database called the Embryonic Stem Cell Registry. BushÕs order requires the NIH to add known adult stem cell lines to the registry, and renames the database the ÒPluripotent Stem Cell Registry.Ó Embryonic stem cells are called ÒpluripotentÓ because they can develop into any kind of tissue. Conservatives opposed to embryonic stem cell research frequently cite new research showing that some kinds of adult stem cells, including those derived from amniotic fluid and umbilical cords, have qualities similar to embryonic stem cells. Many scientists caution that no other form of stem cell has yet been shown to be as consistently pluripotent as embryonic cells. The White House said that the new name for the NIH registry Òreflects what the stem cells can do, instead of where they come from.Ó House Democratic Caucus Chairman Rahm Emanuel, D-Ill., called BushÕs executive order an Òattempt to fool the American public and soothe his conscience with a symbolic gesture that has empty medical value.Ó Congressional Quarterly by Photo Scott J. Ferrell

06/20/07--Rep. Michael N. Castle, R-Del., talks to reporters after a news conference after President Bush vetoed a bill Wednesday that would expand federally backed embryonic stem cell research. Castle is a sponsor of the House version of the legislation, along with Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo. It was the third veto of BushÕs presidency, and the second time he has vetoed embryonic stem cell research legislation. It may not be the last time, as lawmakers are discussing adding an...
more »

Copyright Congressional Quarterly Inc.