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07/19/06--Rep. Michael N. Castle, R-Del.,  during a news conference at the Capitol Hill Club urging President Bush not to veto stem cell legislation that passed the Senate Tuesday. (The Capitol Hill Club is a Republican social club near House office buldings.) President Bush did exercise the first veto of his presidency, rejecting a bill that would have removed existing constraints on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. "This bill would support the taking of innocent human life in the hope of finding medical benefits for others. It crosses a moral boundary that our society needs to respect, so I vetoed it," Bush said at a White House event. The Senate just a day ago cleared the legislation by 63-37, four votes short of the two-thirds margin needed to override. The House, which passed the bill last year by 238-194, was expected to take up the vetoed measure later Wednesday. However, as last year's vote suggested, it is highly unlikely that the House will be able to override the veto. The Senate would not vote on an override unless the House musters the needed two-thirds majority. Congressional Quarterly Photo by Scott J. Ferrell

07/19/06--Rep. Michael N. Castle, R-Del., during a news conference at the Capitol Hill Club urging President Bush not to veto stem cell legislation that passed the Senate Tuesday. (The Capitol Hill Club is a Republican social club near House office buldings.) President Bush did exercise the first veto of his presidency, rejecting a bill that would have removed existing constraints on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. "This bill would support the taking of innocent human...
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