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WASHINGTON - July 11: Sara M. Taylor, a former White House aide, and attorney W. Neil Eggleston, as she testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the firings of nine U.S. attorneys. She declined to answer many questions about the firings, citing executive privilege. But Taylor insisted that no one in the White House did anything improper in connection with the dismissals last year. "I don't believe that anybody in the White House did any wrongdoing," Taylor said. Democrats chafed at President Bush's claim of executive privilege over Taylor's testimony, and made it clear they think the White House orchestrated the firings. "Karl Rove should be sitting at that table, not Sara Taylor," said Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill. "Karl Rove should be answering these questions, not you." Chairman Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., said the White House claim of privilege showed that it was "contemptuous of the Congress." "I would urge Ms. Taylor not to follow that contemptuous position and not follow the White House down this path," Leahy said. "This is a serious matter and has serious consequences for the administration of justice. " But Taylor did not deviate from upholding Bush's claim of executive privilege. When asked by the panel's top Republican, Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, about the appointment of Tim Griffin, a former Bush political operative, who temporarily replaced H.E. "Bud" Cummins III as the U.S. attorney in Arkansas last year, she vigorously defended Griffin. Taylor told the committee she was "upset" when Griffin was not formally nominated to a four-year term in that post. "I was upset because we had pulled, in my view, sort of the rug out from Tim Griffin," Taylor said.. (Photo by Dana Statton/Congressional Quarterly).

WASHINGTON - July 11: Sara M. Taylor, a former White House aide, and attorney W. Neil Eggleston, as she testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the firings of nine U.S. attorneys. She declined to answer many questions about the firings, citing executive privilege. But Taylor insisted that no one in the White House did anything improper in connection with the dismissals last year. "I don't believe that anybody in the White House did any wrongdoing," Taylor said....
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