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UNITED STATES - ARCHIVE: CAPTION:..In this 1978 photograph, then Chairman Louis Stokes of Ohio leads a hearing of the Select Committee on Assassinations in the Cannon Caucus Room. In the early 1970's, the public became concerned with accusations and allegations of conspiracy within the U.S. intelligence communities.  Of particular concern were reports of serious and illegal FBI surveillance of various public figures such as the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  These reports alleged that FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover had personally ordered such illegal measures.  Questions were thus raised as to whether there was any involvement by the FBI in Dr. King's murder, as well as whether a proper investigation of President John F. Kennedy's assassination was conducted.With this public pressure, the House of Representatives considered H. Res. 1540 in September of 1976 which would establish a Select Committee on Assassinations.  Although there was not enough time in the 94th Congress to proceed with such an investigation, the House passed the resolution on 17 September 1976.  Speaker Carl Albert of Oklahoma chose Representative Thomas Downing of Virginia to be its first chairman.  After Downing's retirement at the end of the 94th Congress, Representative Henry Gonzalez of Texas took over the chairmanship in 1977.  However, shortly after being appointed chair in early 1977, Gonzalez submitted his resignation on 1 March 1977.  Representative Louis Stokes of Ohio was chosen to be the new chairman until the termination of the committee upon its final report on 2 January 1979.  The committee concluded that there was, "a high probability that two gunmen fired at President John F. Kennedy," and that, "there is a likelihood that James Earl Ray assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King as a result of a conspiracy."..  (Office of the House Historian/Roll Call via Getty Images)

UNITED STATES - ARCHIVE: CAPTION:..In this 1978 photograph, then Chairman Louis Stokes of Ohio leads a hearing of the Select Committee on Assassinations in the Cannon Caucus Room. In the early 1970's, the public became concerned with accusations and allegations of conspiracy within the U.S. intelligence communities. Of particular concern were reports of serious and illegal FBI surveillance of various public figures such as the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. These reports alleged that FBI...
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