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WASHINGTON, DC - Nov. 20: Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, leaves the Senate chamber after saying farewell. The felony conviction that was Stevens' undoing was barely a footnote Thursday when his colleagues on both sides of the aisle bade an emotional farewell to the longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history. A hush fell upon the crowded chamber when the 85-year-old Alaskan rose to address the Senate for a final time. "I have two homes: One is right here in this chamber, and the other is my beloved state of Alaska. I must leave one to return to the other," Stevens said in a 10-minute speech. Roughly two dozen Republicans and a handful of Democrats were on hand, including Daniel K. Inouye-D-Hawaii, Stevens' best friend in the Senate, and Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. On Wednesday, Stevens conceded to his Democratic challenger, Anchorage Mayor Mark Begich.  (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly)

WASHINGTON, DC - Nov. 20: Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, leaves the Senate chamber after saying farewell. The felony conviction that was Stevens' undoing was barely a footnote Thursday when his colleagues on both sides of the aisle bade an emotional farewell to the longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history. A hush fell upon the crowded chamber when the 85-year-old Alaskan rose to address the Senate for a final time. "I have two homes: One is right here in this chamber, and the...
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