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WASHINGTON, DC - June 20: Dr. Thomas F. Farr, visiting associate professor of religion and international affairs at Georgetown University, and a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs. Farr, former head of the State  Department's Office of International Religious Freedom, says that the American foreign policy establishment suffers from what he calls "religion deficit disorder," even as religious belief takes an ever more prominent role in shaping global conflict. A consequence is that when a religion-based political party comes  to power in the Muslim world, as the Islamic AKP, or Justice and Development Party, did a year ago in Turkey, American diplomats can appear tongue-tied. Some viewed the AKP's win as a severe threat to the traditionally secularist outlook of modern Turkey, while others hailed the election as a potentially heartening occasion for observant Muslims to enter the country's political mainstream and thereby resist the lure of more militant Islamist movements. "We are divided over the implications of an Islamic party in power in a democratic system," said Farr. (photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly)

WASHINGTON, DC - June 20: Dr. Thomas F. Farr, visiting associate professor of religion and international affairs at Georgetown University, and a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs. Farr, former head of the State Department's Office of International Religious Freedom, says that the American foreign policy establishment suffers from what he calls "religion deficit disorder," even as religious belief takes an ever more prominent role in shaping...
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